Workshop Descriptions

Below is a list of workshops we have run for courses in the past. All workshops run between 1 and 2 hours, but length and content can be adapted to meet your course's particular needs.
 
CRAFTING AN EFFECTIVE PRESENTATION
2-4 students; 1 hour
Students learn the basics of building and giving a presentation. Speaking Fellows guide students through Cicero’s 5 canons (invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery) as they discuss audience analysis; how to organize and outline a speech; how to create a logical, persuasive argument; and the characteristics of effective, memorable presentations.
 
EMPOWER YOUR PARTICIPATION IN CLASSROOM DISCUSSIONS
3-5 students; 1 hour
Students reflect on skills that make a productive seminar discussion -- how to respond to one another’s ideas, how to ask questions, how to challenge one another, and how to use the conversation as a tool for rigorous intellectual inquiry. Students practice building an argument through debate exercises, skills they then apply to a mock discussion about an article they read in the workshop (we have articles on hand for this purpose, but if you have a short article that draws on the rest of the course material, please let us know).
 
FACILITATING A CLASS DISCUSSION
3-5 students; 1 hour
Students learn how to create and run an effective class discussion. In the first half of the session, students focus on reading critically, forming an opinion, and generating questions for discussion. In the second half, students discuss how to engage their classmates and guide the discussion. The workshop ends with a mock facilitation activity using material related to their class.
 
FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR FUNDAMENTALS
Series of 3 workshops
This series provides Barnard First-Years with an introduction to the skills necessary to participate in a seminar. The first workshop focuses on engaging in classroom discussion, and the second strengthens presentation skills. The last, a one-on-one (1 student/1 hour), provides students the opportunity to work individually with a Speaking Fellow on a particular presentation.
 
SENIOR THESIS PRESENTATIONS
Series of 3 workshops
In the first workshop, students put together and present the introduction to their presentations, with a balanced focus on both content and delivery. The second workshop is an in-depth one-on-one, specifically aimed at helping each student strengthen her individual presentation (1 student/1 hour). The third workshop focuses on impromptu speech exercises and Q&A practice, helping students with the interactive aspect of a thesis presentation.
 
THE ART OF NEGOTIATION
3-5 students; 1 hour
Students learn the basics of first-person win-win negotiation. The session is based on Robert Fisher's method of negotiation: (1) identifying the problem, (2) analysis, (3) approaches, and (4) action ideas. Students walk through the four steps in-depth, culminating in a mock negotiation/role-play activity.
 
PUBLIC ADVOCACY AND DEBATE
4-6 students; 1-2 hours
Students learn and practice advocacy skills through a three-part role-play that incorporates techniques from debate and trial advocacy. The session begins with a two-minute argumentative speech from each participant that is followed by an in-depth questioning and response activity. Students end the workshop with the delivery of their closing rebuttals.
 
CRITICAL DISCOURSES ON IDENTITY
4-8 students; 2 hours
Students learn how to analyze, frame, and integrate their personal experiences into academic discussions, such as class discussions on race and ethnicity. Students discuss how to respond to class dynamics, negotiate authority in class, and critically position one's identity. Students also participate in a simulated class discussion. This session was created with perspectives from Beverly Daniel Tatum's book, Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria?
 
SPEAKING SKILLS FOR REACTING TO THE PAST
4-5 students; 2 hours
Speakers from each Reacting to the Past section compete in a rhetorical debate, in character. Emphasizing the importance of staying in character and making a direct and responsive argument, this workshop uses debate games to enhance the Reacting experience and allows students to build confidence speaking in character.
 
PRESENTING A PROSPECTUS
3-5 students; 2 hours
This workshops prepares students to present "ideas in progress.” Students create speaking outlines, deliver their findings, and articulate the direction of their project. Students will also learn to process feedback and facilitate productive Q&A sessions in class.
 
MOCK TRIAL SERIES
3-5 students; 2 hours
The mock trial session incorporates debate, acting, and analytical skills to teach students how to perform as witnesses, attorneys, and judges in a courtroom setting. The session includes role-playing exercises that show students how to think critically about witness selection, develop arguments, and weigh facts against legal principles in order to come to a legal decision.
 
ONE-ON-ONE SESSION
1 student; 1 hour
Each student pairs up with a Speaking Fellow to have a speaking “consultation” and practice session. Sessions are structured based on the individual needs of each student, which might mean focusing on structure, clarity of argument and main points, use of key words, use of visual aids, delivery, etc. To maximize the benefits of this session, we strongly suggest that the professor require each student to come to the session with a detailed outline of her presentation.